Indigenous Issues: When Will We See REAL Change?

I love NAIDOC week. Not only is it a great time to celebrate my Aboriginality, it’s great to see other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples being recognised for their achievements. It makes me very proud, and makes me think that in many ways Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are advancing our status in the modern world.

Yet having been out of the country – and by consequence, out of direct involvement in Indigenous issues – for almost 2 years now, I’ve had the opportunity to be more of an observer than a direct participant, and I’ve got big concerns over what I’m seeing.

The Indigenous community is full of success stories across all fields: health, education, social justice, business, politics, sports, the arts, advocacy, and almost any other field you would care to mention. Yet when you step back and look at the big, big picture, little, if anything, has changed. The statistics are much the same, the reports are much the same, the discussions are much the same – even when I look back at my own contributions over the last 20 or so years, the things I’ve been saying are essentially the same.

So if we’re doing more, and things are getting better, and we’re achieving our goals, and raising ourselves up from the depths of our past, where is the change that we’ve been looking for? Why are we having the same conversations that we’ve been having for years and years and years? Why are we not seeing more tangible results for our efforts?

This is not to discount the amazing things that people are doing in their respective fields, and we should continue to nurture and support all those who are devoting themselves to the betterment of all our peoples. However, maybe we need to step back for a moment and take in the bigger picture again. Maybe instead of focussing our little piece of the puzzle, we need to start thinking about how we make all the pieces fit together so that we get to the big picture. Maybe we need to be a little more self-critical of ourselves – to step back and look at what we’re doing and ask, “what difference are we really making?”

Because after 20 some years of addressing Indigenous issues, I don’t want to be having the same conversations, reading the same reports and social commentary, nor be part of the same statistics for the next 20. I want results. And I would hope that anyone reading this would want that too.

“Be the change you wish to see in the world.” – Mahatma Ghandi

What do you think needs to happen for us to see REAL change in Indigenous issues? Please feel free to share your thoughts in the comments below.

Reconciling Australia: We Need Acknowledgement More Than Apology

984a1b0af5d47f5f81d26ace274913bdIt’s National Reconciliation Week in Australia, a time intended to build relationships between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians. The last time I spoke about Reconciliation I called for reconciliation between Aboriginal peoples. Yet as I skim through the posts, tweets, memes, and videos posted in commemoration of this week, a sad irony presents itself: there is still so much bitterness, so much anger, so much hurt, and so much division between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians. Reconciliation in Australia seems less likely than ever.

National Reconciliation Week arrives just after National Sorry Day, a day commonly misunderstood to be recognition of the Apology to Australia’s Indigenous Peoples by former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd. While the two are inextricably linked, National Sorry Day commemorates the tabling of the Bringing them Home report on Australia’s Stolen Generation, and is held to both recognise the injustices of the past, and hold the Australian Government accountable for repairing the damage caused by those injustices. It is a day of mourning and remembrance, in much the same way that ANZAC Day is a day of mourning and remembrance.

However, it’s the ‘sorry’ part that seems to be the sticking point. Many Aboriginal peoples feel that ‘sorry’ isn’t enough; that without reparations ‘sorry’ is just a word non-Indigenous people use to absolve themselves of guilt. On the other hand, many non-Aboriginal Australians do not see the point of continuously saying ‘sorry’; at best they feel their remorse is not being accepted as genuine, and at worst, that an apology isn’t necessary for something they personally have not done – that “the past is in the past”. Could it be that the demand for ‘sorry’ is actually driving a wedge between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples, rather than bringing us together?

Perhaps the way towards achieving Reconciliation involves acknowledgement more so than apology. Acknowledgement on both sides of the cultural divide.

The first thing to acknowledge is that Aboriginal peoples are still suffering, in every sense of the word, from the injustices of the past. This does not mean that Aboriginal peoples are “still living in the past”; rather it means that the effects of those injustices are still very much the present, and the immediate foreseeable future, for Aboriginal peoples. It is not the past because Aboriginal peoples are still living it. Non-Aboriginal people don’t need to understand that – in fact it is arguable that anyone not living through that could not truly understand it anyway – but they do need to acknowledge that the suffering experienced by Aboriginal peoples is real, and part of the reason things are the way they are.

By the same token, Aboriginal peoples also need to acknowledge that we are still suffering as well, and this suffering can skew our perceptions of the attitudes of non-Aboriginal peoples towards us. I have seen and heard too many Aboriginal peoples use their suffering as justification for their mistrust of non-Aboriginal people. Sadly, there are still enough non-Aboriginal people whose intolerance and racist attitudes fuel this mistrust, but it is not representative of all – or in my personal belief, even the majority – of non-Aboriginal Australians. Many non-Aboriginal support, or at least want to support, the betterment and empowerment of Aboriginal peoples. We need to acknowledge that, and in doing so let them support us.

There also needs to be acknowledgement on both sides that the disparity between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples in relation to health, education, social justice, and a whole host of other issues, from a moral and ethical viewpoint, is wrong. Everyone knows about these disparities, however what is becoming increasingly obvious is that many have come to believe that these disparities are unavoidable, even normal or expected. It is in no way normal, and should not be expected, much less accepted. Acknowledging the wrongness of this attitude is not just a task for non-Aboriginal peoples: Aboriginal peoples also need to acknowledge that living with these disparities is not part of Aboriginal identity (read my previous article for more discussion on this topic). Betterment is not about assimilation. It’s about levelling the playing field. No one would expect that non-Aboriginal people should lower their standards of health, education, and so on to the level of Aboriginal peoples. Why should there be any resistance on either side to raising those same standards for Aboriginal peoples to those of the greater Australian society?

We don’t need more apologies to achieve true Reconciliation between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians, we need more acknowledgement.  We need to acknowledge the need for remorse, and the need for forgiveness. We need to acknowledge the problems, and the need to find solutions. We need to acknowledge that our differences can be used to unify rather than divide. And we need to acknowledge that we – all of us – are the only ones who can make Reconciliation happen.

Do you believe in Reconciliation? What do you think we need to make Reconciliation happen? More acknowledgement? More apologies? Please feel free to share your thoughts in the comments below.

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Applying Tai Chi to Physical Therapy – Part 2: Gait Training

Walking is a skill that many of us take for granted – let’s face it, when was the last time you actually thought about the way you walk? Yet it is still a skill, and when your ability to walk is suddenly impeded, or lost altogether, you realise just how important it is to your life. Even with disease or injury, many of us find a way to maintain our ability to walk, however any deviation from ‘normal’ gait (the medical term for walking) can often result in the development or compounding of other problems: pain, muscle imbalance, and arthritis being some of the more common, not to mention the difficulty in attending to day-to-day activities.

What is ‘Normal’ Gait and Why is it Important?

I often explain gait as a “controlled fall”. In order to walk, we shift our center of mass (CoM – see Part 1 for an understanding of the importance of CoM) forwards so that our body starts to move forwards. If we allowed this shift in CoM to continue unchecked, we would fall flat on our face. To avoid this, we use a complex pattern of movements to support ourselves on one leg while we place the other one in front of us to arrest our fall. If we keep our CoM moving forward, we have to repeat the pattern again: the leg in front now becomes the supporting leg, and the leg that was supporting us must now swing forward to save us. Repeat over and over again and you are walking.

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The way our limbs and body produce this – not just the movements themselves, but the way they are coordinated – is referred to biomechanically as a ‘gait pattern’. A ‘normal’ gait pattern is a complex, ideal version of these coordinated movements that result in a stable and efficient means of locomotion which has minimal impact on our musculoskeletal system. It is defined by a number of different factors, including joint angles, distribution of mass (ie: the location of CoM), forces applied to the body, and synergy of movements. For a more in-depth explanation of normal gait, check out this article on Physiopedia.

Anything that doesn’t comply to a ‘normal’ gait pattern is considered to be an ‘abnormal’ gait pattern. This is not to say that it is wrong as such, merely that it does not conform to the ideal that is normal gait. Physical Therapists strive to teach people to walk with a normal gait pattern, or as close to a normal pattern as is achievable. For some people this might not be possible, for example, due to anatomical differences, muscle weakness, imbalances, or tightness, neurological changes or deficits, pain and/or injury, disease, aging, or some combination of these factors. However, while the ‘perfect’ gait pattern might not always be achievable, many people who experience problems with walking can be assisted through Physical Therapy to improve their gait pattern, and in doing so their overall functional capacity.

How Can Tai Chi Help?

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Photo courtesy of Gold Coast Tai Chi Academy

Students of Tai Chi spend a lot of time learning to walk correctly. One main example of this is the technique known as mao xing, or ‘cat walking’. In mao xing, the Tai Chi practitioner shifts weight into one leg while stepping forward with the other. The stepping leg has no weight in it right up to the point the heel makes contact with the ground. The practitioner completes the step by gradually transferring weight from the supporting leg to the stepping leg, involving a shift from side-to-side and back-to-front. As the stepping leg is loaded it becomes the supporting leg, eventually freeing up the other leg to take another step forward.

This sounds very similar to normal gait, however a key difference is the location of the person’s CoM. As already described, normal gait requires the CoM to be displaced forwards outside the person’s base of support BoS), providing momentum. In mao xing, however, the CoM is maintained within the BoS while weight is shifted from one limb into the other, effectively eliminating the “falling” part of walking. To do this successfully, the Tai Chi student must develop a deeper understanding and awareness of how their body moves, in terms of coordination, weight shift, loading and unloading of the limbs, and placement of the feet. As a Physical Therapist, if I could have all my patients mao xing I wouldn’t have to worry about any of them having falls!

Applying Tai Chi to Physical Therapy: Recovery from Joint Replacement Surgery

Recently I’ve been applying the principles of mao xing in retraining normal gait patterns in patients who’ve undergone total hip or knee replacements. In the first weeks after surgery, many joint replacement patients demonstrate a very “stiff-legged” gait pattern: they tend to hold the operated leg very stiff when attempting to mobilise, and limit the amount of time they bear weight through the limb. In some cases the patient will circumduct or swing their leg around rather than bend their hip and knee in order to take a step forwards. Some patients may also have been walking like this for sometime prior to their surgery due to the nature of the condition that required joint replacement.

It can be quite challenging to retrain patients to walk with a normal gait pattern again, and often requires very precise practice. This has been particularly true in patients who have had bilateral joint replacements, who don’t have a ‘good’ leg to support themselves on and so are very guarded with attempting to walk.Though I haven’t been trying to teach my patients mao xing as such (though I often think I would like to), I’ve found that incorporating a number of the principles of mao xing – stepping onto the heel, rolling through the foot to come up onto the toes and push-off – as well as instructing the patient in a similar manner to how I would teach the technique to a Tai Chi student, provides a much more correct and consistent result than other methods I’ve tried. I’ve also found in practice that focusing on the principles related to the foot (heel strike, weight shift, stance, toe off) produce a subsequent improvement in the pattern of movement at the knee and hip – that is, an increase in the amount of flexion at the hip and knee during swing phase – and tolerance to weight-bearing during stance phase. When I apply these principles to gait training, I seldom have to draw attention to or correct movements at the hip, knee, or lumbo-pelvic area as these seem to correct themselves when the patient is applying the principles to their feet.

Lastly, and in some ways the most exciting part, is that I’ve found that patients are more likely to practice this “creeping” (as several patients have referred to it) way of walking as part of their home exercise program than they are other techniques or exercises designed to improve their gait. The exact reason why is unclear, however I would suggest it is because it is easier for the patient to conceptualise, understand, and apply, than other techniques that are more detailed and require a higher level of cognitive processing. In practice this apparent increase in compliance and attendance to exercises between therapy sessions does appear to translate – in general – into a more timely improvement in gait and physical function.

Again, this is at best observational evidence of a specific application of Tai Chi principles to physical therapy. However, it does support the increasing body of evidence-based research advocating  Tai Chi as a means of improving balance and mobility, and in my opinion, is worth further investigation as an adjunct to physical therapy.

Recognising the Modern Aboriginal

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When I was a student at the University of Canberra I spent a lot of time hanging out at the Ngunnawal Centre, a drop-in/support centre for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students. It was a great place, not just because of the services and support it provided, but because we had such diversity of students, from all over Australia, all different backgrounds, all different ideas and experiences. It was, generally speaking, a place of acceptance, and my time there and the people I met there certainly helped strengthen my identity as an Aboriginal person.

I remember once walking into the common room into a very passionate discussion about maintaining culture. One guy was making his opinions known about the evils of materialism and how we were all becoming “white fellas” and how he wanted to get back to “traditional life”. It was a stirring speech that many of us could identify with, especially those who had limited exposure to a ‘traditional’ cultural upbringing. That is, until someone said, “watchya on about? You’re not gonna give up your Nikes and your mobile phone for a spear and a lap-lap!” Which, needless to say, we all had a good laugh at.

Since then I have often thought about the challenge many Aboriginal peoples face with regards to living a modern life in a modern world while attempting to live up to cultural values and beliefs that are considered the definition of ‘being Aboriginal’. It is truly a case of walking in two worlds, a walk that would be much easier were those worlds allowed to merge into one.

Adaptation is a key component of evolution; a marker of whether a species thrives or dies. If there is one thing I’ve learned about my Aboriginal culture, it’s that we have survived for so long because of our ability to adapt. We have adapted to the environment, to the availability – or scarcity – of resources, to contact with other cultures, and even to invasion. Yet despite this ability, it seems there is an unwillingness to allow Aboriginal peoples to ‘evolve’ into the 21st century. That to be ‘Aboriginal’ is to remain in a pre-invasion state of existence, and any deviation from this somehow makes us less Aboriginal.

Adaptation is not assimilation. Yet that seems to be the view that many Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people take when Aboriginal peoples take advantage of the modern world, the modern conveniences, or even the modern ideas that exist today. Drive a nice car, live in a nice house, in a nice suburb, have an advanced education, a career, a desire for nice things like clothing, furniture, or lifestyle, and suddenly you’re assimilated, a sell-out, a big-noter, a coconut. You’re no longer a ‘real’ Aboriginal, because ‘real’ Aboriginal peoples don’t have, nor want, those things.

Yet think about some of the things that we wouldn’t have if Aboriginal peoples hadn’t adapted the the changes that surrounded them. There would be no repeal of the various Aborigines Protection Acts. There would be no Freedom Ride. No 1967 Referendum. No NAIDOC. No Aboriginal flag. No Aboriginal doctors, nurses, lawyers, teachers, police, soldiers, politicians, sport stars, business owners, writers, musicians, actors, tradespersons, or journalists. You would not be reading this article. Aboriginal peoples would still be considered part of the Australian ‘fauna’. If we existed at all.

Most, if not all, Aboriginal peoples have already lost so much of their culture and heritage. It is critical to our survival and our identity that we preserve as much as we can. Yet if we are to thrive – not just survive – we must allow ourselves to embrace those elements of 21st century life that can be used to our advantage and for the betterment of our peoples.  We need to understand and accept that an Aboriginal person today is not the same as an Aboriginal person 250 years ago, or even 25 years ago, and recognise that can be a good, even desirable, thing.

Yes, we must value, retain, and give to future generations as much of our cultural heritage as we can. However, we must also live in the modern world, take advantage of it, adapt it to our needs, and use it for the betterment – the empowerment – of our peoples and communities.

How else can we expect to progress?


What is your take on what a modern Aboriginal person is, or should be? Please share your thoughts in the comments section below.

Why Texting is the Worst Form of Communication

couple textingI know you’ve heard it all before: texting is impersonal, it’s antisocial, and it’s ruined our ability to communicate with each other. Yet we all do it. Why? Because it’s also easy, convenient, and often timely. So why would I call texting the worst form of communication? The answer lies not so much in texting itself, so much as how we are using it to communicate.

When we use it as a messaging system to convey mundane, day-to-day information like, “I’ll be finished at 6:30pm”, “can you get milk on your way home?”, “you have a doctor’s appointment at …”, it can actually be very effective. It’s when we try to expand this from an expression of facts or data to something more abstract – for example, thoughts and feelings – that the message tends to get lost amongst the text. As I see it, there’s three main limitations that texting has over other forms of communication that often causes it to fail.

1. Communication is much more than words

You’ve probably come across the idea that over 90% of communication is non-verbal. While many linguists and sociologists dispute this figure and the ability to actually quantify the contribution of verbal and non-verbal components when communicating, it is generally agreed that effective communication relies significantly on vocal intonation and body language. In other words, how we represent ourselves physically, and how we sound, puts what we have to say – the actual words – into a certain context that the words alone cannot achieve.

Consider this snippet from a text conversation that perhaps all of us are familiar with:

Person A: Are you ok?

Person B: I’m fine.

What was your gut reaction to this? Did you accept Person B’s answer as literal? Did you find it dismissive or evasive? Or did it send a chill down your spine thinking they are anything BUT fine?

The fact is, we cannot know for sure whether Person B really is fine, or whether they are just saying that to avoid (or encourage) further discussion, or whether they are being sarcastic or passive-aggressive, because we have no other information – a look, a tone of voice, a body position – to help us put this statement into context. Person A then has two choices: they can either request more information, or they can interpret the meaning Person B intended.

Many of us don’t make the former choice, because we feel there’s an expectation (either our own, or from the other person) that we understand what is being said to us, so we come up with our own interpretation. The problem is our ability to make that interpretation is not only influenced by the person communicating with us – not just the words they use but our connection to and understanding of them – but also by a whole myriad of internal and external factors affecting our cognitive and emotional state at the time. Consider for a moment how you might interpret Person B’s response if you felt happy, worried, angry, or confused. How does it influence what you’re hearing them say?

And this is only from what appears to be a simple, everyday exchange between two people. Imagine how it is once the content becomes more complicated…

2. We are always communicating, even when we aren’t.

This is another way of expressing a fundamental principle of Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP): you cannot not communicate. That is, even if you are not saying something, you are still communicating with someone through your actions. Consider as an example someone listening to you speak: are they leaning forward, focussed on you? Are they leaning back, arms crossed? Are they turned away from you or focused on something else? In each instance, although that person isn’t saying anything, they are still sending you a message.

When you can see someone these non-verbal interactions are generally easier to interpret. When texting, it’s almost impossible. Imagine you are texting back and forth with someone and they suddenly stop responding. You cannot know why they stopped responding until you get some sort of indication from that person. However, as we cannot not communicate, no response can be interpreted as a response in itself. In fact, the longer the ‘silence’ goes on, the more we try to interpret that silence. Did they get interrupted? Did the device they’re using suddenly stop working? Did they get offended by what you said or just lose interest in the conversation? Did they even get your last message? Again, your interpretation of what has happened will be very dependent on the internal and external influences on your own cognitive and emotional state at the time, including the context and perceived importance of the conversation you were having.

3. We have developed an expectation of instant gratification

There was once a time, not too long ago, when we were not always instantly accessible. If you wanted to speak with someone, you either had to know where they were and go to them in person, or you had to call them on the phone and hope they were able (or wanted) to answer, or you had to write them a letter and wait for them to receive it and respond. And as a society, we were quite accepting of that. We appreciated that being able to communicate required timing, effort, and in many cases, patience.

Today, we are all expected to be instantaneously available on demand, and texting is one of the primary causes of this. While we recognise that everyone has their own lives and responsibilities, and therefore may not be available to meet in person or take a phone call, texting is believed to be so unobtrusive that any of us should be able to do it at any time. That’s a problem in two ways.

The first relates back to our point about not being able to not communicate. When we text, we expect a timely, if not instant response. When we don’t get one, the scenario discussed in the second point above plays out.

But there’s also the responder to consider. Receiving a text message is often welcomed, however it can also be invasive. What if you’re at work, or at a family event, or a romantic dinner with your partner and you receive a text; do you answer it? That’s a hard question to answer: if you don’t, how’s the person who sent it going to react? If you do, how’s the person you’re with going to react? Seems like a no one situation, and in many instances, it can be. Either way you are sending a message to both people, and that not be the message you want to convey.

This is not to say we shouldn’t use texting as a means of communicating, in fact it can be a very valuable way of staying in touch with people or conveying important information. However, like any form of communication, texting is only useful if you consider its limitations, and work around those limitations.

Maybe the most effective text you can send someone is, “Hi. Can we get together for a chat?”

Applying Tai Chi to Physical Therapy – Part 1: Weight Shift

I have been an advocate for Tai Chi (taiji quan) for at least as long as I’ve been a Physical Therapist, and have previously written about the benefits Tai Chi can bring to physical therapists and physical therapy. In this series, I aim to share some of the ways I’ve been able to apply the principles and practice of Tai Chi to my therapy skills, an in doing so enhance my patients’ care.

What is ‘Weight Shift’ and Why is it Important?

In basic terms, weight shift is our ability to move our center of mass (CoM) – our ‘weight’ – around our body in order to maintain – or disrupt – our balance. Think of your CoM like a pendulum or a plumb-bob; when you stand with perfect balance, your CoM sits right in the middle of your base of support (ie: the area around your feet). Once you start moving, your ‘pendulum’ moves as well, generally in the direction you are moving. We do this all the time  – in fact, if we couldn’t move our CoM, we couldn’t move at all.

An easy way to understand weight shift is to attempt to stand on one leg. To do this, you have to move your CoM – or ‘swing your pendulum’ – over your supporting leg so you can lift the other leg off the ground. If you don’t, you won’t be able to lift your leg, or if you do, you body will want to fall over to that side. You can try this for yourself to see how it feels (just make sure you do it by a table or counter top so you’ve got something to grab onto if you need it!).

20131110232510-fall-menBeing able to weight shift not only facilitates movement, it can help prevent unwanted or undesirable movement, for example, falling. Falling is a major contributor to injury and death amongst many populations: in the US, falling is considered to be leading cause of both fatal and non-fatal injuries. Physical therapists spend a great deal of time trying to both prevent falls in patients, and help patients recover from falls. Teaching patients to understand both how their CoM affects their balance, and how to shift their weight appropriately for safe movement, is critical to achieving functional movement and stability. However, in many patients the ability to weight shift is impaired either because of disease (eg: neuropathy, arthritis, vertigo) and injury (eg: stroke, spinal and nerve injuries), and regaining the ability to control weight shift can be very difficult.

How Can Tai Chi Help?

Weight shift is one of a number of fundamental skills Tai Chi training can improve or enhance. Almost every movement in any form from start to finish involves a gradual, controlled transfer of weight in coronal, sagittal, and transverse planes of movement. In order to perform the forms correctly, Tai Chi practitioners control the displacement of their CoM in all planes through slow, precise movements. In most instances, the CoM remains ideally located within the practitioner’s base of support, making it easy to maintain balance. This is evident even when the practitioner is performing ‘unbalanced’ movements, such as standing on one leg.

A classic example of this is the technique known as mao xing, or ‘cat walking’. In mao xing, the Tai Chi practitioner shifts weight into one leg while stepping forward with the other. The stepping leg has no weight in it right up to the point the heel makes contact with the ground. The practitioner completes the step by gradually transferring weight from the supporting leg to the stepping leg, involving a shift from side-to-side and back-to-front. As the stepping leg is loaded it becomes the supporting leg, eventually freeing up the other leg to take another step forward. (Note: this is a very simplistic description of mao xing and there is a lot more involved in it, however this illustrates the basic concept. I recommend trying Tai Chi to better understand mao xing)

One main difference between mao xing and regular walking is the way weight shift is controlled. In regular walking, the CoM is displaced forward of the body, and the body’s reaction is to shift weight to one leg while stepping through with the other. Keeping the CoM displaced forwards and alternately repeating the sequence facilitates movement while preventing a fall forwards. In effect, walking is a repeatedly controlled fall. (Note: again, this is an overly simple description of walking, however is biomechanically accurate) Mao xing on the other hand, keeps the CoM positioned ideally within a person’s base of support at all times, even when one leg is not supported on the ground. Consider this in terms of a person who has an impaired ability to weight shift, such as someone who has a dense hemiplegia following a stroke. Which method of walking would you consider safest to have them perform?

Applying Tai Chi to Physical Therapy: Stroke and Femoral Nerve Injury Examples

Recently I was able to apply the principles of mao xing to improve the mobility of two patients who had difficultly with weight shift: a middle-aged male with a dense left hemiplegia following a stroke, and an elderly female with the inability to maintain knee extension following an injury to her femoral nerve. Neither patient was able to support weight on their affected side and both were consequently such a high risk of falling they could only mobilize in a wheelchair. Therapy included exercises to encourage weight shift and improve the ability to bear weight over the affected side, however in both instances progress was slow and their was little retention between therapy sessions.

Using the principles of mao xing, I had both patients practice stepping into a lunge stance with their affected side, then returning to a neutral standing position. Patients practiced the gradual loading and unloading of the affected side, first supported and then with standby assistance as their skill improved. In both cases, within the completion of 2 sets of 10 repetitions there was an observed improvement in the patient’s understanding and ability to shift weight to the affected side, and in maintaining standing balance. With successive therapy sessions and in conjunction with other exercises, both patients advanced their ability to weight shift to the point where they were able to stand and mobilize with an appropriate aid. The male with the hemiplegia was ultimately able to mobilize with a cane independently. The female with the femoral nerve injury has so far progressed to be able to mobilize with a standard frame under supervision.

This is, at best, observational evidence of a specific application of Tai Chi principles to physical therapy, and weight shift is only one aspect of maintaining balance. However, it does support the increasing body of evidence-based research advocating  Tai Chi as a means of improving balance and mobility, and in my opinion, is worth further investigation as an adjunct to physical therapy.

A New Day

Opportunity from Disaster

Three years. A hundred posts. At least that many comments. That was raygates.me as I had grown and nurtured it. And with a click of a button, it was all gone.

That’s what I discovered about a week ago, and it was devastating. My blog wasn’t just a project or a hobby. I poured a lot of myself into those articles. It wasn’t just words I lost; it was a large part of myself. A part I had chosen to put out there for anyone and everyone to see.

My first instinct was to contact the host of my site to see if they had a backup they could restore. An unlikely solution, given that they were the ones to delete it in the first place, but when disaster strikes you’ll try anything. As I waited for customer service to come to my rescue, I questioned myself about the value of what I was attempting. Was there any value in attempting to restore all those musings? For that matter, was there any value in continuing with the blog at all? I hadn’t written anything for it in months (though in my defense, I was [am] still adjusting to moving to the opposite side and hemisphere of the planet). Was it really worth continuing with? Did it matter? If it disappeared from the digital universe, would it be missed? Perhaps this disaster had occurred for a reason. maybe it was time for me to give up. Draw the curtain. Fade to black.

The thing is: that isn’t me.

Funnily enough, that revelation came to me not in relation to the blog, but to my personal life, and once that fact broke through the gloom that had descended upon my heart and mind, I realised this wasn’t a disaster but an opportunity. An opportunity to reinvent myself. Not necessarily a complete personality and life change, but an opportunity to review where I’ve been, where I am, and where I’m going. More importantly, an opportunity to choose where I want to go, and what I want to do next.

That was my problem: I didn’t realise, or perhaps hadn’t accepted, that making major changes in my life would also impact all the things I had previously planned. I was stuck trying to follow a map that no longer matched the landscape, trying to find the path to something I had already left behind.

It took a ‘disaster’ of this proportion to shake me off that path, to make me realise that my direction has changed, and so too has my destination. There will be similarities, even sameness to a certain extent; I’m not going to simply through everything I was working towards away. However, this is an opportunity for change. An opportunity to re-evaluate who I am, and who I want to be. Where I am, and where I want to go. What I’ve done, and what I’ve yet to achieve. It is a good thing, and most likely it’s exactly what I needed.

So, although there is still some heaviness in my heart, I will not be trying to resurrect my old blog, or my old posts. That was then, this is now. This is a new beginning. What this blog ends up being remains to be seen. I might be part diarisation, part documentation, part manifesto, part insight, and maybe even part egotism. What it will be is all me, based on the many hats I wear.

Whether you are one of my previous readers returned, or a new reader recently discovered, I hope you will stay with me as I chisel away the debris to reveal the masterpiece underneath. It will take some time, and it will likely look rough for a while yet. However, I look forward to discovering, with you, what it looks like.A New Day

 

 

Never Give Up

never_give_up_640_29I’d be surprised if anyone reading this has not experienced some point in their life when they felt like giving up on something. Maybe it was a relationship, a job, or a lifelong dream. Maybe it was trying to understand something, or help someone else understand. Maybe it was just trying to get your computer or phone to do what it’s supposed to do. We’ve all had times when it got too hard, too frustrating, too hurtful, or too impossible to keep going, and the only viable option seemed to be: give up.

Plow through the multitude of advice and self-help guides both on- and off-line and you can find innumerable references to make it easier for you to give up on things. Knowing when to quit – when to give up and walk away – has become a life-skill. There is merit in this: engaging in exercises of futility benefit no-one, least of all ourselves. If anything, they might cause far more harm or grief than abandoning them would. But how many things we pursue, or cling to, or believe in, are truly futile? How many just seem that way, because we lose hope, or faith, or motivation, or sight of our goal, or what set us in motion towards it in the first place?

The great African-American human rights advocate Frederick Douglass is often quoted as saying, “if there is no struggle, there is no progress.” Inherent in this statement is the concept of never giving up. In the remainder of the address this quote is taken from, Douglass effectively states that all things worth having require effort. More than this, there is no promise that our efforts will be rewarded with what it is we want, however without that effort we guarantee we will not have it. Within this ideal, futility is not the effort required to do something exceeding that which we are capable of, but rather our own fears, doubts, and insecurities overcoming our resolve to keep striving for what is important to us.

This is not to say that we should just persist with things no matter what. There are numerous situations where continuing to do something would be detrimental, even harmful, to yourself, or even to others. What makes the difference is your thoughts, feelings, and beliefs about the thing you are deciding whether to give up on or not.

If something has true value to you, if it has true meaning, or is truly important to you; if something has true significance to you, is something you truly believe in, or is a fundamental part of your life, or the life you want, then never give up on it. It is worth the effort it takes to have it, and hold on to it. It is worth the fight, the struggle, the pain, the heartache, and the sacrifice required to have it.

I know when the lights go out in the universe, I would rather bow out knowing I never gave up on the things that meant everything to me, than spend my final thoughts regretting those I did.

The World Needs Heroes – Are You Ready?

kid-heroIt might sound like a throw away line from the latest superhero movie, however the fact is that the world does need heroes. We all do. Heroes inspire us and motivate us. They give us hope. They give us something to believe in, and something to aspire to be. They make us feel good about ourselves, and about the world at large.

For many of us our heroes are the larger-than-life people who have achieved great success in their lives. We find heroes amongst sports stars, entertainers, business and community leaders, and dare I say even politicians. These heroes are obvious because their success has put them in the public spotlight. They are interviewed and talked about and promoted to the extent that even though they might not be our personal hero, we cannot miss the fact they are heroes to somebody.

But then there are the others, the ones we often refer to as the ‘everyday’ or ‘unsung’ heroes. These are the ones whose faces you won’t see advertising the latest energy drink or sports footwear, or promoting their latest book, fragrance or clothing line. We find them in all walks of life: health professions, emergency services, military service, educators, religious leaders, volunteers, and parents to name a few. They become our heroes not just for what they do as much as for the fact that they do it at all, often without thought or need of thanks or compensation. They do it because to them it is the right thing to do – and for that they gain our admiration.

I have a number of heroes, and I would like to introduce you to two of them.

Jade is your typical 9-year-old Australian girl, who is constantly coming up with ideas to raise money for charities. She has supported everything from the preventing animal cruelty to research into childhood diseases. In her latest venture, she has taken it upon herself to make and sell what she calls ‘pink puppies’ – a folded piece of pink paper with a puppy dog face drawn on it. She drew her inspiration from the pink ribbon campaign known worldwide for raising funds to combat breast cancer – something she became aware of when her best friend’s grandmother commenced her own battle with the disease. Jade’s intent is to sell her pink puppies for 25 cents each, and donate all the money to Cancer Council Australia. She started by folding 50 pink puppies, which if sold will raise $12.50 for Cancer Council Australia. When asked if she thought it was worth all the work for a relatively small amount of money, she said, “it still helps, doesn’t it?”

Across the world, Emma is an all-American 10-year-old girl, who recognised a problem in her school and made a decision to try to fix it. That problem is bullying – an anti-social behaviour that is being increasingly recognised and publicised for the physical, mental, and emotional trauma it causes, particularly in school-age children. To tackle this in her own school, Emma decided to form an anti-bullying club to help other kids recognise bullying and give them the confidence to put a stop to it. In Emma’s words, “We don’t want kids to be bullied because we think it is wrong. We are hoping that when we are doing this we can encourage the bullies to stop! We want to help people feel better about themselves, which will help people step up to bullies.” Emma took a proposal to form the anti-bullying club to her school principal, and is waiting for the green light to go ahead.

Jade’s and Emma’s stories show us what it is to be a hero. At ages where all they should be worried about is what they’re going to do with their friends on the weekend, they have taken it upon themselves to make a difference in the lives of others, and to make our world a better place. Their selfless actions and altruistic intentions should inspire all of us. They show us that it is not just the act itself, but the intention behind the act, the desire to stand up and do something – anything – to make a difference, no matter how great or small, that is what makes a real hero.

Jade and Emma show us that we all have it within ourselves to be a hero. Are you ready to be a hero to someone today?

“I think a real hero is any person really intent on making this a better place for all people.”

– Maya Angelou

Who are your heroes? What makes them a hero to you? Please share your thoughts in the comments section below.

Words vs. Actions: Which is Greatest?

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When was the last time you heard someone say, “actions speak louder than words?” How about, “the pen is mightier than the sword?” Words and actions have been stuck in an endless grudge-match since both coexisted. Both have their merits and pitfalls, their strengths and weaknesses. Yet does one have an advantage over the other? Are words in fact stronger than actions? Or will actions always win out over words?

There’s no question that words can be very powerful, a topic I’ve touched on before. We’ve all felt their power at one time or another in our lives: “you’ve passed”, “you’ve failed”, “you’ve got the job”, “we’ve given the job to someone else”, “I love you”, “I hate you”, “I’m so proud of you”, “I’m so disappointed in you” are simple examples of phrases that have most likely had a profound effect on you when you’ve heard them. Even “yes” and “no” can be powerful within certain contexts; just think about the impact either word can have in answer to the question, “will you marry me?”

Words have proven their power through the evolution of language and communication. It’s important to realise that our use of words is not only for pragmatic reasons. Consider the difference between reading a book in order to obtain knowledge and information, and reading one purely for pleasure and enjoyment. Consider why we read poetry, or listen to songs. Greeting card companies exist because of the power of words. Words influence us. They are powerful enough to alter our thoughts and our emotions. If they can alter our thoughts and emotions, then they can also influence our actions and behaviour. If our can be determined by words, then perhaps they are more powerful than actions.

However, what are words without actions behind them? Consider a situation where someone says they can do something, but then demonstrates they really can’t. Or makes a promise, but fails to keep it. Or apologises for something they did, and then does exactly the same thing again. The words become meaningless, and words without meaning have no power. They lose their ability to influence, convince, or support anything. In this sense, words need actions; they are dependent on actions to reinforce them, to give them credence and credibility, to make them mean something. Actions reveal the level of truth behind the words, and that determines what influence the words have upon us.

For example, if someone says, “you can trust me”, and then demonstrates through their actions that you can in fact trust them, this will have a powerful effect on your perception of that person and relationship with them. However, an equally powerful effect will occur if that person’s actions demonstrates that you cannot trust them. The words themselves are unchanged – “you can trust me” – so they are not what determines the direction of influence. It is the actions the person undertakes after speaking them that determines their meaning (or lack thereof), and the ultimate outcome. If words can only derive their meaning from the actions behind them, then it surely it stands to reason that actions are stronger than words.

Consider what happens though when there are no actions, or to put another way, when someone undertakes the action of inaction. You’ve probably encountered this situation numerous times: ever sent an email or left a voice message and not had any response from the recipient? Ever scheduled an appointment with someone and they just haven’t shown up? Ever told someone something and their only answer was silence? Those who follow the concept of neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) tell us that a person cannot not communicate: that is, even when someone does not respond to us, that lack of response is in fact a response in itself. The problem is, how do you know what they’re trying to communicate to you? Are they ignoring you? Are they indifferent? Are they considering? Do they simply have nothing to say or contribute? Or perhaps they haven’t had time to respond? Maybe they didn’t get your message at all? How do you know what they’re telling you?

The fact is you cannot know what the lack of action means without some form of clarification, and this will almost always be through the use of words. Words can explain both action and inaction, and thereby give those actions context and meaning, which then helps our understanding and comprehension. In fact, sometimes words are all you’ve got to be able to convey something to someone else.

Consider a couple separated by distance – perhaps one is a soldier stationed overseas, or needs to travel for business, or for whatever reason just can’t be with the person they belong with. Under these circumstances, the physical presence that conveys the love, security, and support through the many non-verbal cues and actions that occur when they are together is absent. Does this mean all those things suddenly stop, or change, or become less important? Not at all. However, many couples struggle with this situation simply because while they detect this absence – that something is ‘missing’ – they are unable to resolve it, or at least accommodate it, through other means. In this instance, words can be vital, because they might be all you have. We know that words influence feelings, emotions, and behaviours, and if it’s all you’ve got, then doesn’t that make them a great asset in terms of maintaining what you share as a couple?

This is not to suggest words can substitute for actions, nor that one needs to become a poet or bard in order to use words effectively in this type of situation. But saying something – saying anything – about how you feel about someone, what they mean to you, how important they are to you, or your relationship together is to you, can help ensure that you don’t ‘lose’ anything during your time apart.

Now here’s the real kicker. Ask a couple that’s been through this: was it the words themselves, or the action of expressing them, that made the difference? What do you think they will say?

It’s easy to keep going around in circles with this discussion, and therefore why words and actions have been squaring off for so long. Is one stronger than the other? Sometimes, yes, one does appear to be stronger, or have more meaning, or more power, than the other. Ultimately though, both words and actions are equally powerful; it is the context that determines the balance between the two. What does this mean in practical terms? My advice would be: don’t choose a side, or better yet, choose both sides. Just say what you mean, and mean what you say, and you will have the power of both.

Where do you stand? Are actions more important than words? Are words more powerful than actions? Are both equally important to you? Please share your thoughts in the comments below.