Why Australian Health Insurers Should Cover Tai Chi

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Photo courtesy Gold Coast Tai Chi Academy

 

Regular readers will be well aware of my advocacy of Tai Chi as a means of maintaining optimal health for the lifespan. (For those who are new, click on the Tai Chi tag to read past articles about the benefits of Tai Chi). There are few forms of exercise that can boast the wide range of physical and mental health benefits, whilst being accessible to people of all ages and abilities, as Tai Chi does.

Health insurers around the world have increasingly recognised the benefits of enabling their members to engage in activities designed to promote healthy lifestyles, and thereby maximise health and well-being. The rationale is simple: engaging in preventative health practices minimises the risks of developing more serious, complicated, and/or debilitating conditions, and therefore reduces both the incidence and level (not to mention the expense) of future medical care required. For example, it is far better from an insurers point of view to support a member to engage in a weight management program, gym membership, and nicotine replacement therapy, than it is to support them through coronary artery bypass surgery and the follow-up care afterwards.

As a result, most, if not all, health insurers now offer some form of support for members to engage in activities designed to maintain or improve their health. The types of activities vary between insurers: in Australia, common activities covered include gym and personal training, yoga, Pilates, and weight management programs. Yet despite its known benefits to health, Tai Chi is not currently covered by any major Australian health insurer. Why?

It’s a good question. Considering that health insurers will, for the most part, only cover treatments or activities that are supported by clinical evidence to be effective in maintaining or improving health, Tai Chi is possibly one of the better examples of evidence-based interventions for good health. A good example of this can be found in a review published in the American Journal of Health Promotion (1.). In this article, Jahnke and colleagues examined the outcomes of randomised controlled trials investigating the outcomes of both Tai Chi and Qigong exercises, and found evidence of positive outcomes for numerous health factors, including bone health, cardiopulmonary health, physical function, falls prevention, immunity, psychological conditions such as anxiety, depression and self-efficacy, and general quality of life. This is by no means an exhaustive list: research since publication continues to identify more health conditions for which Tai Chi can be beneficial. In the face of such evidence, and considering that many insurers cover a range of complimentary or alternative health practices whose evidence based is equal to or less than that of Tai Chi, it seems odd that Tai Chi would not be covered alongside options such as yoga and Pilates.

It becomes even more confusing when you consider that Tai Chi has previously been covered by at least one insurer in Australia. In 2010 the Tai Chi Association of Australia (TCAA) reported that MBF (which has since merged and is now known as Bupa) had recognised Tai Chi for inclusion in its Lifestyle Bonus option, and as much as 70% of class fees could be covered under certain conditions. At the time of writing however, Tai Chi does not appear to be covered under Bupa’s Living Well programs, whereas other forms of exercise such as yoga and Pilates are, and the reasons for this remain unknown.

Another point of consideration is the fact that Tai Chi is gaining recognition and support from the broader health and medical industry for its health benefits. An increasing number of doctors, physiotherapists, exercise physiologists and other health professionals are recommending Tai Chi as a part of maintaining a healthy lifestyle. A number of hospitals and health services either conduct, or are connected to, Tai Chi classes, and promote this to their patients and the broader community. For example, the South West Hospital and Health Service in rural south-west Queensland offers free Tai Chi classes to the general public. This is similar to programs offered by local councils, such as the Gold Coast City Council’s Active and Health Program which includes Tai Chi amongst its variety of healthy activities. In addition, the benefits of Tai Chi have been formally recognised and endorsed by a number of peak representative bodies, including Arthritis Australia, Diabetes Australia and Osteoporosis Australia.

In the light of such evidence, recognition and support, it seems to only make sense that health insurers should be including Tai Chi alongside other already recognised activities such as yoga and Pilates. Indeed, health insurers in other countries, for example the United States, have already recognised the benefits of including Tai Chi in their own benefits packages. Surely the inclusion of Tai Chi within a healthy lifestyle package can only serve to benefit health insurer’s members, and in doing so, benefit the insurers themselves.

Do you practice Tai Chi? Do you have private health insurance? Do you think health insurance should cover Tai Chi, as it does other activities such as yoga and Pilates? Please share your comments below.


References

1. Jahnke, R., et al. (2010). A comprehensive review of health benefits of Qigong and Tai Chi. American Journal of Health Promotion, 24(6): e1-e25.

 

Words vs. Actions: which is stronger?

Pen_Mighter-620x330When was the last time you heard someone say, “actions speak louder than words?” How about, “the pen is mightier than the sword?” Words and actions have been stuck in an endless grudge-match since both coexisted. Both have their merits and pitfalls, their strengths and weaknesses. Yet does one have an advantage over the other? Are words in fact stronger than actions? Or will actions always win out over words?

There’s no question that words can be very powerful, a topic I’ve touched on before. We’ve all felt their power at one time or another in our lives: “you’ve passed”, “you’ve failed”, “you’ve got the job”, “we’ve given the job to someone else”, “I love you”, “I hate you”, “I’m so proud of you”, “I’m so disappointed in you” are simple examples of phrases that have most likely had a profound effect on you when you’ve heard them. Even “yes” and “no” can be powerful within certain contexts; just think about the impact either word can have in answer to the question, “will you marry me?”

Words have proven their power through the evolution of language and communication. It’s important to realise that our use of words is not only for pragmatic reasons. Consider the difference between reading a book in order to obtain knowledge and information, and reading one purely for pleasure and enjoyment. Consider why we read poetry, or listen to songs. Greeting card companies exist because of the power of words. Words influence us. They are powerful enough to alter our thoughts and our emotions. If they can alter our thoughts and emotions, then they can also influence our actions and behaviour. If our can be determined by words, then perhaps they are more powerful than actions.

However, what are words without actions behind them? Consider a situation where someone says they can do something, but then demonstrates they really can’t. Or makes a promise, but fails to keep it. Or apologises for something they did, and then does exactly the same thing again. The words become meaningless, and words without meaning have no power. They lose their ability to influence, convince, or support anything. In this sense, words need actions; they are dependent on actions to reinforce them, to give them credence and credibility, to make them mean something. Actions reveal the level of truth behind the words, and that determines what influence the words have upon us.

For example, if someone says, “you can trust me”, and then demonstrates through their actions that you can in fact trust them, this will have a powerful effect on your perception of that person and relationship with them. However, an equally powerful effect will occur if that person’s actions demonstrates that you cannot trust them. The words themselves are unchanged – “you can trust me” – so they are not what determines the direction of influence. It is the actions the person undertakes after speaking them that determines their meaning (or lack thereof), and the ultimate outcome. If words can only derive their meaning from the actions behind them, then it surely it stands to reason that actions are stronger than words.

Consider what happens though when there are no actions, or to put another way, when someone undertakes the action of inaction. You’ve probably encountered this situation numerous times: ever sent an email or left a voice message and not had any response from the recipient? Ever scheduled an appointment with someone and they just haven’t shown up? Ever told someone something and their only answer was silence? Those who follow the concept of neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) tell us that a person cannot not communicate: that is, even when someone does not respond to us, that lack of response is in fact a response in itself. The problem is, how do you know what they’re trying to communicate to you? Are they ignoring you? Are they indifferent? Are they considering? Do they simply have nothing to say or contribute? Or perhaps they haven’t had time to respond? Maybe they didn’t get your message at all? How do you know what they’re telling you?

The fact is you cannot know what the lack of action means without some form of clarification, and this will almost always be through the use of words. Words can explain both action and inaction, and thereby give those actions context and meaning, which then helps our understanding and comprehension. In fact, sometimes words are all you’ve got to be able to convey something to someone else.

Consider a couple separated by distance – perhaps one is a soldier stationed overseas, or needs to travel for business, or for whatever reason just can’t be with the person they belong with. Under these circumstances, the physical presence that conveys the love, security, and support through the many non-verbal cues and actions that occur when they are together is absent. Does this mean all those things suddenly stop, or change, or become less important? Not at all. However, many couples struggle with this situation simply because while they detect this absence – that something is ‘missing’ – they are unable to resolve it, or at least accommodate it, through other means. In this instance, words can be vital, because they might be all you have. We know that words influence feelings, emotions, and behaviours, and if it’s all you’ve got, then doesn’t that make them a great asset in terms of maintaining what you share as a couple?

This is not to suggest words can substitute for actions, nor that one needs to become a poet or bard in order to use words effectively in this type of situation. But saying something – saying anything – about how you feel about someone, what they mean to you, how important they are to you, or your relationship together is to you, can help ensure that you don’t ‘lose’ anything during your time apart.

Now here’s the real kicker. Ask a couple that’s been through this: was it the words themselves, or the action of expressing them, that made the difference? What do you think they will say?

It’s easy to keep going around in circles with this discussion, and therefore why words and actions have been squaring off for so long. Is one stronger than the other? Sometimes, yes, one does appear to be stronger, or have more meaning, or more power, than the other. Ultimately though, both words and actions are equally powerful; it is the context that determines the balance between the two. What does this mean in practical terms? My advice would be: don’t choose a side, or better yet, choose both sides. Just say what you mean, and mean what you say, and you will have the power of both.

Where do you stand? Are actions more important than words? Are words more powerful than actions? Are both equally important to you? Please share your thoughts in the comments below.

Walk the Talk: Why your word is one of your greatest assets

Promise_Pinky Promise2Ever made a promise but didn’t keep it? What about one that you knew you couldn’t keep at the time you were making it? Chances are, if you’ve ever promised anyone anything, you’ve encountered a time where you just couldn’t keep your word. There may have been legitimate reasons for this, or maybe you just didn’t want to or think it was important. The reactions of those you made the promise to were most likely also determined by the nature of the promise, how much it meant to them, and whether they expected you would keep it. But does it really matter if we break our promises? Should we really be beholden to things we may have said on the spur of the moment, or under certain pressures or emotional conditions?

I’ve always tried to live by the adage, “don’t make promises you cannot keep.” The reason for this is because a person’s word does have value, whether it be in your personal or professional life. The value of our word is reflected in others perceptions of our credibility, our reliability, and our trustworthiness. It influences their desire to want to interact with us, both currently and into the future. Evidence of this is everywhere: the couple that breaks up after a broken promise, the customer who never returns to a store that did not honour an agreement or guarantee, or the politician who is voted out of office for failing to deliver on the claims that got them elected. But why is this so important? Why do we hold promises in such high regard?

A promise is a binding agreement; a vow, a guarantee, a covenant, a bond, or a commitment.It is more than a statement of intention, in that by making a promise you are pledging to ensure that you will do whatever it is you are promising to do.You could think of it as entering into a contract with someone, where you declare that a certain action or undertaking to be performed, under whatever conditions are agreed upon. Failure to keep your promise could be considered to be a ‘breach of contract’, with resultant penalties. In some cases, promises made ‘innocently’ can be enforced by legal means, as the law often does not differentiate between a spoken promise and a promise made through a formal agreement, such as a contract.

This is where a person’s word can gain or lose its value. You may have heard the phrase, “my word is gold”, and it can be useful to think of the value of a person’s word in such financial terms. Because a promise is not just a statement, but a guarantee, it holds a certain value. You could think of making a promise as making an investment in your word – your credibility, reliability, and trustworthiness – and giving it value. Keep your promise, and the value of your word ‘appreciates’. It increases its net worth, so the next time you make a promise, it is already at this new, higher value. To the promisee, this means your credibility, reliability and trustworthiness are already at a higher level, which means they will be more likely to ‘invest’ in your word, and subsequently in you.

What’s important to realise is that this is not just a one-to-one phenomenon. As your word increase in value with one person, that person then becomes your advocate, your ‘broker’ if you will. They share the value of your word with other people, and may even convince people to ‘invest’ in your word for themselves. In this way, the value of your word grows both actively – through direct interaction with individuals – and passively – through an on-flow effect to others. This is why we see marketing slogans such as, “1 million satisfied customers” – we think to ourselves, “if they were all satisfied, perhaps I will be too.”

Conversely, your word can just as easily ‘depreciate’ in value if you break your promises. Fail to deliver, or follow through, or do the complete opposite of what you guaranteed, and you can be sure that without extenuating circumstances to explain it, your word will suffer. This can have a compound effect if you tend to make and break the same promise over and over again. In fact, breaking the same promise multiple times can result in an exponential reduction in the value of your word. For an example of this, visit any court of law hearing divorce cases: you will likely hear many references to promises broken again and again.

This is also not confined to a one-to-one situation. If your word loses value with one person, you can almost be sure it will lose value to some extent with every person that one comes into contact with. This can have a disastrous effect on your credibility, reliability and trustworthiness, and can make future interactions with others very difficult, if not impossible. It is the reason why many businesses adopt the customer service policy of, “the customer is always right”.

So how do you give your word value? Or more importantly, how do you increase it’s value? Here’s four tips on how you can ensure your word is a worthwhile investment for others:

1. Only make promises you know you can keep – or at least that you know you have every intention to keep. If you know from the start that you cannot, or most likely will not, keep a promise, don’t make it in the first place. You are only setting yourself up for failure, and the fallout can be difficult to recover from. In fact, in many instances people may appreciate that you cannot promise something more than they will a broken promise.

2. Only promise what you can deliver – similar to the point above, this is about being able to ‘walk the talk’, that is, not overestimating or overstating what you can really do. Equally true for business as well as personal relationships, it can be easy to make a grandiose promise, yet fall short in being able to deliver on it. This is not always as bad as failing to keep a promise at all, however it can still damage the value of your word. For example, as a physiotherapist, I never promise my patients that I can cure them, because there are so many variables outside of my influence or control that could affect their final outcome – not the least of which being what they themselves do outside of treatment sessions. What I do promise them is that I will give them my very best level of care, because that is completely within my control and ability to deliver on.

3. No promise is too small – we always remember the big promises that people make or break, but there is great value in all the little ones that are made as well. It’s the little things that attribute to our consistency, our ability to deliver on something over and over and over again, and this can have a much higher net value than one large promise. All promises have value, and the smaller ones are every bit as valuable as the big ones. Think of it like building a wall: you can use the biggest bricks you can find, but it’s the mortar in between that holds it all together.

4. If you must break a promise, show good reason – in a given lifetime, very few people, if any, will be able to keep every promise they make. There are only so many things we can control, and even when we get all of these right, sometimes extenuating circumstances stop us from being able to deliver what we promised. If the reason for not keeping a promise can be seen as plausible, then you can minimise, even eliminate, any detrimental effect this might have on the value of your word. For example, a delivery company promises to deliver, “on time, every time.” But what if there is unusually heavy traffic? Or their vehicle breaks down? Or worse, they have an accident? Would it be fair to devalue their word under these circumstances? Ultimately, that is in the hands of the promisee. However, it is far more likely that someone will forgive a broken promise when it can be shown that it was beyond your control to keep it, than they will if they believe you could have done something to prevent it.

Whether it’s in business, in personal relationships, or even to yourself, invest in the value of your word, make it one of your greatest assets, and it will reward you accordingly.

Are promises important to you? How does a kept promise influence your interactions with others? What about a broken one? Please feel free to share your thoughts in the comments section below.

3 of Tai Chi’s Lesser Known Health Benefits

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Photo courtesy Gold Coast Tai Chi Academy

Tai Chi (T’ai Chi Ch’uan) is well-known and widely practiced for its health benefits. It’s particularly regarded for its ability to improve balance, range of motion, and lower limb strength, and has been highly researched to establish its effectiveness as a form of exercise for the elderly. In fact, there has been a great deal of research conducted on Tai Chi and Qigong exercises, and both the scientific evidence and the range of health conditions Tai Chi can prove beneficial for is constantly growing.

As a physiotherapist who practices and has been involved in teaching Tai Chi, I keep an eye on the evidence-based research coming out about Tai Chi and its benefits to people, so I can use this to advocate for Tai Chi as a form of therapeutic exercise. What has been interesting is seeing the breadth of research that is being undertaken, and the health conditions that Tai Chi is being shown to produce positive outcomes in beyond the classic falls prevention, various forms of arthritis, and age-related deconditioning. Conditions that I don’t believe most people would normally associate Tai Chi as being able to influence, much less produce positive outcomes. I’d like to illustrate this by bringing three such conditions to your attention, which you may not have been aware of.

Tai Chi and Breast Cancer

g32025800000000000058a37129c5f09d9942b164d878e1e23852dd1738This has been of particular interest to me having had someone I care about recently undertake their own battle with breast cancer, as well as a number of past patients. Over the last several years researchers have been examining the effectiveness of Tai Chi as an intervention to prevent or improve secondary health conditions experienced by breast cancer survivors.

For example, a recent study by Galantino and colleagues (1.) has shown the feasibility of Tai Chi in improving the well-being of postmenopausal breast cancer survivors who have developed arthralgias (joint pain) as a side effect of being prescribed aromatase inhibitors (eg: Aromasin, Arimidex and Femara) to reduce estrogen production. Their study demonstrated statistically significant improvements amongst their test subjects for anxiety, depression, emotional well-being and fatigue, as well as the Sit-and-Reach test, and near statistical significance for pain severity, physical well-being, the Berg Balance Scale and Timed-Up-and-Go Test. This is important because, as the authors state, there are very few interventions that have been developed to counteract the side effects associated with this form of post-breast cancer therapy, and consequently many breast cancer survivors stop using their medication. If Tai Chi can limit the negative side effects of this type of therapy, not only can it improve peoples physical and emotional well-being, it can potentially increase adherence to medication regimes, and thereby reduce the risk of these survivors developing future complications.

The benefits Tai Chi can have on post-cancer symptoms experienced by many breast cancer survivors have also been demonstrated by other researchers. Huang and colleagues (2.) found that breast cancer survivors who engaged in physical activities like Tai Chi and Qigong demonstrated a proportional decrease in cancer-related fatigue compared to those who did not, while Sprod and colleagues (3.) demonstrated changes in biomarkers including insulin, glucose, and cortisol levels which correlated with improvements in health-related quality of life, physical functioning, social functioning and general mental health. Overall, the evidence is growing that breast cancer survivors – particularly those who are post-menopausal – would gain significant benefit from regular Tai Chi practice.

Tai Chi and Depression

Depression is an all-too-common, and in many ways still poorly managed, mental health condition in many societies, and one I encounter frequently amongst patients, particularly those suffering from chronic pain. While it is difficult to locate studies that have solely examined the relationship Tai Chi can have on depression, many studies exist where depression has been one of the variables measured as part of using Tai Chi as a form of therapeutic intervention.

One chronic pain condition that has been well-researched in terms of  the effects of Tai Chi is fibromyalgia. An example of this is the research from Wang and colleagues (4.), who measured a number of physical, mental and emotional well-being indicators, including depression, amongst their participants who were engaged twelve weeks of Tai Chi training. Not only did they demonstrate improvements in measures of depression at the end of the twelve weeks of training, but these improvements persisted 12 weeks after the cessation of the training. Similar improvements in mental health measures, including depression, were reported the studies described for breast cancer suffers above.

Results such as these have led researchers and clinicians to call on health professionals to support patients wanting to explore Tai Chi as a form of complimentary therapy to treat issues such as depression. In their editorial in The New England Journal of Medicine, Yeh and colleagues (5.) called on physicians to ‘prescribe’ Tai Chi for patients with fibromyalgia, while psychotherapist Mary Ann La Torre (6.) advocates the use of body movement – in particular, Tai Chi, as a means of creating change and enhancing healing in psychotherapeutic treatment.

On a personal level, not only am I aware of the impact Tai Chi has on my own mental health, I have had patients with a variety of conditions where depression has been a component (for example, chronic pain, cancer, and HIV-positive status) who have all anecdotally reported improvements in their mental health and well-being having commenced Tai Chi training. It would be interesting to see future research specifically investigating the effects of Tai Chi on individual mental health conditions, such as depression, as these results would likely be transferable across a wide range of health conditions where depression is a factor.

Tai Chi and Diabetes

Another condition of close personal interest to me, not only because of its disproportionally high incidence amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait peoples, but also because several people dear to me have either Type I or Type II diabetes. It is well-known that exercise is beneficial for the management of both types of diabetes, so it would be reasonable to expect that Tai Chi would produce similar benefits. However, what is interesting in the research being undertaken is that Tai Chi is not only beneficial for the secondary conditions associated with diabetes, for example, impaired mobility due to peripheral vascular complications (7.), it also has a direct effect on cellular physiology. For example, several studies have demonstrated that Tai Chi practice can increase insulin sensitivity and thereby reduce A1C levels (a better indicator of blood glucose levels over time, as opposed to the immediate result from a blood glucose monitor) (8.), and increase the levels and enhance the activity of regulatory T-cell levels (9.) which improves immune system functioning.

This is critical for those with diabetes, as being able to effect changes at the cellular level means better management of the primary complications associated with diabetes, which can then result in reduced risk of developing, or progression of, secondary complications, such as peripheral vascular disease and neuropathies.

IMG_0357These are only three examples of the wide range of health conditions that Tai Chi is proving itself to be able to make positive changes to. As quality of studies improve and researchers start to identify the specific ways in which Tai Chi can make changes to our health, it is my hope that we will see Tai Chi become a ‘treatment of choice’ in both managing and preventing ill-health.

Do you do Tai Chi? What ways has Tai Chi improved your health and well-being? Please feel free to share your answers in the comments section below.


References

1. Galantino, M. L., et al. (2013). Tai Chi for well-being of breast cancer survivors with aromatase inhibitor-associated arthralgias: a feasibility study. Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, 19(6): 38-44.

2. Huang, X., et al. (2010). Factors associated with cancer related fatigue in breast cancer patients undergoing endocrine therapy in an urban setting: a cross-sectional study. BMC Cancer, 10: 453-459

3. Sprod, L. K., et al. (2012). Health related quality of life and biomarkers in breast cancer survivors participating in tai chi chuan. Journal of Cancer Survivorship: Research and Practice, 6(2): 146-154.

4. Wang, C., et al. (2010). A randomized trial of tai chi for fibromyalgia. The New England Journal of Medicine, 363(8): 743-754.

5. Yeh, G. Y., et al. (2010). Prescribing tai chi for fibromyalgia – are we there yet? The New England Journal of Medicine, 363(8): 783-784.

6. La Torre, M. A. (2008). The role of body movement in psychotherapy. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 44(2): 127-130.

7. Orr, R., et al. (2006). Mobility impairment in Type 2 diabetes: association of muscle power and effect of tai chi intervention. Diabetes Care, 29(9): 2120-2122.

8. Bronas, U. G., et al. (2009). Alternative forms of exercise training as complementary therapy in the prevention and management of Type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Spectrum, 22(4): 220-225.

9. Yeh, S., et. al. (2007). Tai chi chuan exercise decreases A1C levels along with increase of regulatory T-cells and decrease in cytotoxic T-cell population in Type 2 diabetic patients. Diabetes Care, 30(3): 716-718.

5 Tips for Surviving the NPTE

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After eighteen months of preparation, perspiration, and palpitations, I have finally passed the National Physical Therapy Exam (NPTE), administered by the United States of America’s Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy (FSBPT). The NPTE is the means by which all candidates for physical therapy licensure, whether domestic graduates or foreign trained applicants, are assessed for basic entry-level competency for the profession. It is not the only requirement for licensure, however it is the one standarised requirement in all fifty States, and if you want to work as a physical therapist in the USA, you must sit and pass it.

You might think for someone like myself who has been a physical therapist for the past eleven years this would be little more than a formality. Think again. The NPTE is one of – if not THE – toughest exams I’ve ever taken. Unfortunately, those who have taken the exam are prohibited from disclosing any information about the exam itself, so I cannot reveal the anything about its content or structure. I can, however, give some more general advice based on my experience in preparing for and undertaking the exam – advice I would have found invaluable in my own lead-up to the exam date.

Here are my five tips for surviving the NPTE:

1. Allow plenty of time to prepare

A five hour 250 question exam requires ample preparation time. The exams generally run every three months, so depending on where you are in the schedule should guide you as to which exam you should take. Don’t be in a rush to sit the first available exam. It may be in your best interest to give yourself additional time to ensure you are able to cover all the required material, get a feel for the exam with some practice exams (see below), and build your confidence in your ability to do well.

2. Study everything

The NPTE potentially covers the entire scope of practice of physical therapy, from musculoskeletal to neurology, cardiac and respiratory to lifespan, and principles of general practice and research. Chances are you don’t remember everything there is to know about physical therapy, even if you are a new graduate. If you are currently working as a physical therapist, you probably know the area you work in quite well, but haven’t even thought about other areas in a long time. You need to study everything about physical therapy, and feel confident that you can apply that knowledge. It is a big ask, and it is probably the last time you will ever need to know everything about the profession, however it is essential if you want to get through the NPTE.

Didn’t keep all your old textbooks? Fear not, there are some very useful resources to help you revise and prepare for the exam. Two that I used are BenchPrep, an online prepatory course for the NPTE, and PT Exam: The Complete Study Guide by Scott Giles, a reference text which is a thorough summary of all the areas of physical therapy, set out in a way that is specific to the content of the NPTE. BenchPrep is particularly useful as it gives you a study guide, which tells you how much material you need to cover in a given timeframe in order to be ready for the exam, and enables you to connect to other students preparing for the exam to ask questions or form study groups. The PT Exam text I used was a little dated (2011), however the material is still relevant and the practice exams that come with it are very useful indicators of how you’re doing. The resources available are not limited to these and you should search for some that you feel are most appropriate to your needs.

3. Do the practice exams

Find and complete as many practice exams as you possibly can. Not only is it useful to familiarise yourself with the exam situation, it will give you clear feedback as to where your strengths and weaknesses are, and enable you to adjust your study plan accordingly. Both BenchPrep and the PT Exam book have quizzes and practice exams, and FSBPT provides (for a fee) an online practice and assessment tool (PEAT) which very closely mirrors what you can expect from the actual exam. Practice exams enable you to get a feel for how questions will be worded, and practice interpreting the possible answers. Often, the answer that’s required is not a matter of seperating right from wrong, but understanding which answer is the MOST correct based on the information you’re presented with. It takes practice to be able to understand this, particularly if you’re a current practitioner, as chances are you have developed your own ways of addressing the needs of patients, and this may not match to what the examiner is expecting.

4. Seek support

Having good support structures in place is invaluable, both in terms of supporting your study and maintaining your sanity. Having family members, friends, loved ones who can support you during this incredibly stressful time can make all the difference to your mental and emotional health. A little understanding goes a long way, and it’s likely you will need plenty in the lead in to the exam.

Support from other people undertaking the exam is very useful as well. Being able to find discussion forums or study groups can greatly assist your preparation. This gives you the chance to check your understanding about different things, develop your judgement and reasoning, and ensure you are covering everything you need to know. In most groups you will find someone who knows the answer you’re looking for, or who will ask a question you haven’t thought of. It can also be useful to be able to relate to others who are going through the same experience you are.

5. Find ‘you’ time

It can be very easy to narrow your focus to preparing for the exam, and let all other aspects of your life fall by the wayside in the process. Do this, and not only do you risk severely over-stressing yourself, you may cause damage to your health, your relationships, and other things that are important to you. This is where allowing ample time (see 1. above) becomes critical. You need to be able to step away from your study and preparation, if only to give yourself a chance to recharge and recouperate. Take a walk, go to the gym, play with the kids or catch a movie you’ve been wanting to see. There are no bonus points for spending all your time on studying – in fact, chances are by taking some ‘you’ time, you will return to your studies with a clearer mind and sharper focus.

According to FSBPT, only about 88% of US graduates, and 30% of non-US graduates, pass the NPTE the first time. Incorporating these tips into your study plan might just give you the edge on ensuring you are one of those who pass.

If you are preparing to take the NPTE, I wish you the best of luck for a successful outcome, and for your future career as a physical therapist.

Got some other tips for taking the NPTE? Please feel free to share in the comments section below.

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