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5 Reasons Tai Chi is the Most Accessible Form of Exercise

Photo courtesy of Gold Coast Tai Chi Academy

Tai Chi – or taiji ch’uan – is a popular form of exercise well recognised for its health benefits. One of the great things about Tai Chi is that it is readily accessible to everyone. It doesn’t matter how old you are, how fit you are, how much time you have, or whether you have any previous experience in sports, martial arts, or fitness: if you can breathe, you can do Tai Chi.

Here are five great reasons why Tai Chi is the most accessible form of exercise for everyone.

Tai Chi is appropriate for all ages.

You are never too young or too old to practice Tai Chi. Due to its low-impact nature, This is an important consideration when choosing exercise for both the pre-adult and the older adult. Excess forces on the body can be counter-productive for both these age groups. In the pre-adult, the developing musculoskeletal system generally responds well to the forces that various exercises place on it. However, excessive forces can alter or damage critical components – such as growth plates – which can lead to developmental problems. In the older adult, many tissues simply will not take the strain of excessive force, which ultimately leads to injury. Tai Chi movements improve strength and balance without putting a lot of strain or force through the body.

Tai Chi is suitable for all fitness levels.

Tai Chi has no prerequisite level of strength, balance, or cardiovascular fitness level in order to start practicing it. In fact, you don’t even need to be able to stand or walk in order to practice Tai Chi. However, if you have already achieved a moderate or even high level of athleticism, Tai Chi will still offer challenges to you that will benefit your existing health and fitness. The two key reasons for this are Tai Chi’s progressive nature – that is, starting with very basic movements and concepts, and advancing over time to whatever end your mind and body can achieve; and it’s adaptability – a knowledgable Tai Chi instructor will be able to recognise a person’s strengths and limitations, and adapt their training accordingly so they can participate and advance at their own pace.

Tai Chi is gender neutral.

While all forms of exercise are (or should be) equally accessible to women and men, many are developed for, targeted towards, or tend to attract, one gender in greater numbers than the other. Tai Chi is one form of exercise that is truly gender neutral. While some may stereotype the ‘soft’ nature of Tai Chi to beĀ  more suited to females, or its martial aspects to be more appropriate for males, the very nature of Tai Chi is to strike a balance between feminine and masculine aspects. A good Tai Chi class will make women and men feel equally at ease practicing their Tai Chi with each other.

Photo courtesy of Gold Coast Tai Chi Academy

Tai Chi requires no special clothing or equipment.

Whatever you are wearing right now, you are dressed for Tai Chi. Wherever you are, you can do Tai Chi. In addition, many of Tai Chi’s forms are practiced ’empty-handed’, meaning there is no need for special equipment. Ideally you will be wearing loose, comfortable clothing, and have enough space to be able to move through the form you are doing, but neither of those are essential to being able to practice Tai Chi. You can do literally do Tai Chi anywhere. They even do Tai Chi in space!

Tai Chi is easy to learn.

Tai Chi is something that anyone, of any background or ability, can jump straight into. Quality instructors introduce new people to Tai Chi in such a way that they have something they can go home and practice right after their first lesson. It is often said of Tai Chi that it is easy to learn, difficult to master, and with good reason. Yet I’ve seen so many people who are introduced to Tai Chi so pleasantly surprised that they can walk in to a class and just join in right from the start. It’s one of the few forms of exercising that, for the beginner, holds no intimidation.

Tai Chi is easily one of, if not the, most accessible forms of exercise available to everyone. Why not give it a try for yourself?