Tag Archives: change

Indigenous Issues: When Will We See REAL Change?

I love NAIDOC week. Not only is it a great time to celebrate my Aboriginality, it’s great to see other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples being recognised for their achievements. It makes me very proud, and makes me think that in many ways Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are advancing our status in the modern world.

Yet having been out of the country – and by consequence, out of direct involvement in Indigenous issues – for almost 2 years now, I’ve had the opportunity to be more of an observer than a direct participant, and I’ve got big concerns over what I’m seeing.

The Indigenous community is full of success stories across all fields: health, education, social justice, business, politics, sports, the arts, advocacy, and almost any other field you would care to mention. Yet when you step back and look at the big, big picture, little, if anything, has changed. The statistics are much the same, the reports are much the same, the discussions are much the same – even when I look back at my own contributions over the last 20 or so years, the things I’ve been saying are essentially the same.

So if we’re doing more, and things are getting better, and we’re achieving our goals, and raising ourselves up from the depths of our past, where is the change that we’ve been looking for? Why are we having the same conversations that we’ve been having for years and years and years? Why are we not seeing more tangible results for our efforts?

This is not to discount the amazing things that people are doing in their respective fields, and we should continue to nurture and support all those who are devoting themselves to the betterment of all our peoples. However, maybe we need to step back for a moment and take in the bigger picture again. Maybe instead of focussing our little piece of the puzzle, we need to start thinking about how we make all the pieces fit together so that we get to the big picture. Maybe we need to be a little more self-critical of ourselves – to step back and look at what we’re doing and ask, “what difference are we really making?”

Because after 20 some years of addressing Indigenous issues, I don’t want to be having the same conversations, reading the same reports and social commentary, nor be part of the same statistics for the next 20. I want results. And I would hope that anyone reading this would want that too.

“Be the change you wish to see in the world.” – Mahatma Ghandi

What do you think needs to happen for us to see REAL change in Indigenous issues? Please feel free to share your thoughts in the comments below.

The World Needs Heroes – Are You Ready?

kid-heroIt might sound like a throw away line from the latest superhero movie, however the fact is that the world does need heroes. We all do. Heroes inspire us and motivate us. They give us hope. They give us something to believe in, and something to aspire to be. They make us feel good about ourselves, and about the world at large.

For many of us our heroes are the larger-than-life people who have achieved great success in their lives. We find heroes amongst sports stars, entertainers, business and community leaders, and dare I say even politicians. These heroes are obvious because their success has put them in the public spotlight. They are interviewed and talked about and promoted to the extent that even though they might not be our personal hero, we cannot miss the fact they are heroes to somebody.

But then there are the others, the ones we often refer to as the ‘everyday’ or ‘unsung’ heroes. These are the ones whose faces you won’t see advertising the latest energy drink or sports footwear, or promoting their latest book, fragrance or clothing line. We find them in all walks of life: health professions, emergency services, military service, educators, religious leaders, volunteers, and parents to name a few. They become our heroes not just for what they do as much as for the fact that they do it at all, often without thought or need of thanks or compensation. They do it because to them it is the right thing to do – and for that they gain our admiration.

I have a number of heroes, and I would like to introduce you to two of them.

Jade is your typical 9-year-old Australian girl, who is constantly coming up with ideas to raise money for charities. She has supported everything from the preventing animal cruelty to research into childhood diseases. In her latest venture, she has taken it upon herself to make and sell what she calls ‘pink puppies’ – a folded piece of pink paper with a puppy dog face drawn on it. She drew her inspiration from the pink ribbon campaign known worldwide for raising funds to combat breast cancer – something she became aware of when her best friend’s grandmother commenced her own battle with the disease. Jade’s intent is to sell her pink puppies for 25 cents each, and donate all the money to Cancer Council Australia. She started by folding 50 pink puppies, which if sold will raise $12.50 for Cancer Council Australia. When asked if she thought it was worth all the work for a relatively small amount of money, she said, “it still helps, doesn’t it?”

Across the world, Emma is an all-American 10-year-old girl, who recognised a problem in her school and made a decision to try to fix it. That problem is bullying – an anti-social behaviour that is being increasingly recognised and publicised for the physical, mental, and emotional trauma it causes, particularly in school-age children. To tackle this in her own school, Emma decided to form an anti-bullying club to help other kids recognise bullying and give them the confidence to put a stop to it. In Emma’s words, “We don’t want kids to be bullied because we think it is wrong. We are hoping that when we are doing this we can encourage the bullies to stop! We want to help people feel better about themselves, which will help people step up to bullies.” Emma took a proposal to form the anti-bullying club to her school principal, and is waiting for the green light to go ahead.

Jade’s and Emma’s stories show us what it is to be a hero. At ages where all they should be worried about is what they’re going to do with their friends on the weekend, they have taken it upon themselves to make a difference in the lives of others, and to make our world a better place. Their selfless actions and altruistic intentions should inspire all of us. They show us that it is not just the act itself, but the intention behind the act, the desire to stand up and do something – anything – to make a difference, no matter how great or small, that is what makes a real hero.

Jade and Emma show us that we all have it within ourselves to be a hero. Are you ready to be a hero to someone today?

“I think a real hero is any person really intent on making this a better place for all people.”

– Maya Angelou

Who are your heroes? What makes them a hero to you? Please share your thoughts in the comments section below.