Tag Archives: NAIDOC

Indigenous Issues: When Will We See REAL Change?

I love NAIDOC week. Not only is it a great time to celebrate my Aboriginality, it’s great to see other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples being recognised for their achievements. It makes me very proud, and makes me think that in many ways Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are advancing our status in the modern world.

Yet having been out of the country – and by consequence, out of direct involvement in Indigenous issues – for almost 2 years now, I’ve had the opportunity to be more of an observer than a direct participant, and I’ve got big concerns over what I’m seeing.

The Indigenous community is full of success stories across all fields: health, education, social justice, business, politics, sports, the arts, advocacy, and almost any other field you would care to mention. Yet when you step back and look at the big, big picture, little, if anything, has changed. The statistics are much the same, the reports are much the same, the discussions are much the same – even when I look back at my own contributions over the last 20 or so years, the things I’ve been saying are essentially the same.

So if we’re doing more, and things are getting better, and we’re achieving our goals, and raising ourselves up from the depths of our past, where is the change that we’ve been looking for? Why are we having the same conversations that we’ve been having for years and years and years? Why are we not seeing more tangible results for our efforts?

This is not to discount the amazing things that people are doing in their respective fields, and we should continue to nurture and support all those who are devoting themselves to the betterment of all our peoples. However, maybe we need to step back for a moment and take in the bigger picture again. Maybe instead of focussing our little piece of the puzzle, we need to start thinking about how we make all the pieces fit together so that we get to the big picture. Maybe we need to be a little more self-critical of ourselves – to step back and look at what we’re doing and ask, “what difference are we really making?”

Because after 20 some years of addressing Indigenous issues, I don’t want to be having the same conversations, reading the same reports and social commentary, nor be part of the same statistics for the next 20. I want results. And I would hope that anyone reading this would want that too.

“Be the change you wish to see in the world.” – Mahatma Ghandi

What do you think needs to happen for us to see REAL change in Indigenous issues? Please feel free to share your thoughts in the comments below.

Why Identify?

20140126_142430-1Happy NAIDOC week to all of you who celebrate it! NAIDOC week is a great week of celebration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, our culture, and our achievements. For me, it’s always a time to not only celebrate my Aboriginality, but to reflect on what it means to me, what I’ve done to celebrate it within myself, and what I want to do to recognise and celebrate it as my life moves forward. This year, inspired by NAIDOC and the Deadly Bloggers Inaugural Blogging Carnival, as well as some personal experiences I’ve had over the last couple of years, I’ve decided to share with you my thoughts on two questions that I have been asked on numerous occasions, and often together: “Why do you identify as Aboriginal?” and “What do you get out of it?”

The second question is particularly interesting, as it suggests that there is still a perception within certain parts of the Australian community that the only reason anyone would identify as Aboriginal is to gain some sort of tangible benefit from it. This disappoints me for two main reasons: first, because while I mostly get asked this by non-Aboriginal people, it’s not uncommon for some Aboriginal people to challenge me with it as well; and second, because it indicates to me that when it comes to Aboriginal identity, there is still confusion and concern over the difference between Aboriginal ‘identity’ and Aboriginal ‘identification’.

It seems that some people still harbor a fear or resentment that calling yourself ‘Aboriginal’ will grant you some form of entitlement that their own biases don’t believe you should have. While there is no doubt there will always be those who will look for ways to abuse any system for their own benefit, to my way of thinking, questioning whether someone who identifies as Aboriginal does so only for personal gain is equivalent of questioning whether someone with a serious physical or mental disability only identifies as such to gain disability benefits. Yes, there may be abusers, but to question the motivations of everyone who identifies with any group is quite ludicrous. As another Aboriginal man said to me years ago, “why would anyone who wants some sort of advantage over others choose to identify with the group that has the poorest health, the poorest education, the poorest employment, and the worst racism? If I wanted an advantage, I’d choose to be white!”

However, the truth is I do gain from identifying as Aboriginal. What I gain from it is a greater sense of self. I do not identify as Aboriginal, so much as my Aboriginality gives me my identity. It tells me who and where I came from, and who and where I’m connected to. It helps to form my world view, and my place within that world. It influences the person I want to be, through my morals, my ethics, and my approach to life. That is not to say that it is separate from the other things that make up me – it is one of many pieces of my personal puzzle, which together provide the full picture that is me. It is as important in defining who I am as is being a man, or a father, or a healthcare professional, or any one of a number of the hats I wear. It gives me ME, and I would be incomplete without it. I would not know myself, and that is a terrible way to live one’s life.

So, why do I identify as Aboriginal?

Simple. That’s who I am.

And if you know who you are, and what gives you that sense of self, I have no doubt you will understand exactly what I mean.

What more reason could anyone need?