Tag Archives: pride

Should Non-Indigenous Australians Be Proud of Indigenous Culture?

984a1b0af5d47f5f81d26ace274913bdAll this month, I’ve had the pleasure of both contributing to, and reading, some of the great blogs that have made up the Deadly Bloggers Blogging Carnival as part of Australia’s Blak History Month. While the blog articles themselves have been diverse and interesting, what struck me was the interaction and involvement through the various social media platforms. Particularly during NAIDOC week, I noticed a tremendous support from Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander, and non-Indigenous peoples, liking, favouriting, and sharing my articles and articles both other Deadly Bloggers.

What I found especially exciting was the amount of involvement from non-Indigenous people, who were obviously reading, sharing, and enjoying post from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander bloggers. More than that, people wanted to spread these messages, to share Australia’s Indigenous identity, if you will, to the point where – for me at least – there seemed to be definite evidence of pride in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and culture. It got me thinking: why not? Why shouldn’t non-Indigenous Australians be proud of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and culture? Surely, that can only be a positive thing, right?

So I decided to see what the people thought by creating a simple survey titled, “Should non-Indigenous Australians be proud of Indigenous culture?”, and sent it out amongst the digital masses. The response was very interesting.

Over about three weeks I managed to get 83 respondents, of which 76 completed all the questions. The majority of respondents were non-Indigenous (64.5%), female (62%), and aged between 40 and 60 years of age (60.5%).

The first section attempted to determine the current perception of non-Indigenous Australian’s opinions towards Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Specifically, whether non-Indigenous Australians know about and are proud of Indigenous Australian cultures, and whether they consider this an important part of Australia’s identity. It should be noted that these questions were about the respondents perceptions of the greater Australian community, not their own personal perception.

From the responses obtained, it seems that in general people believe that non-Indigenous Australians neither know about (64% No vs. 19% Yes), nor are proud of (59% No vs. 19% Yes) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Further, the respondents’ perception was that non-Indigenous Australians generally do not consider Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures an important part of Australia’s identity (51% No vs. 34% Yes). While this may not surprise many given Australia’s sociopolitical history and track record in Indigenous affairs, it becomes very interesting when considered in the context of the next question.

The second section consisted of one simple question, and the opportunity for respondents to explain their answer. The question: in your opinion, should non-Indigenous Australians be proud of Indigenous Australian culture?

An overwhelming 95% of respondents answered, ‘Yes’, while the remaining 5% answered ‘Don’t Know’.

This is a remarkable contrast. It seems people are saying that non-Indigenous Australians should be proud of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, even though they might not currently be, or perhaps know enough to be, and that it is important for Australia’s identity. This is further supported in many of the additional comments respondents made in answering this question.

In explaining why they thought non-Indigenous Australian’s should be proud of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, several common themes emerged from the ideas put forward. These included:

  • the richness, diversity, and spirituality of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures;
  • the long history of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as the original inhabitants of this land Australia;
  • the connection and relationship Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have to the land, including understanding of land management; and
  • the social values inherent in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, and how these could enhance the broader Australian society.

This is reflected in statements such as:

“Because Indigenous Australian’s are the traditional owners of the land and bring with them a unique culture. We could learn more as non Indigenous people especially with regard to kinship values, the importance of the land and spirituality”

“Yes – it is what is unique to Australia, something that differentiates us from the rest of the world; we have one of the longest living cultures in the world and we should be proud of it and cherish it whether we are Indigenous or not.”

“Indigenous culture is a valuable resource for all Australians. It is rich and diverse, it is enduring and adaptable. It speaks with the voice of our ancient past. Indigenous culture advises us on how to care for the natural world and for each other. The language, art, music, learning,rituals, rules and ways of living cans inform all our ways of living.”

Some supported the idea in principle, however argued that ‘pride’ may not be as appropriate a term as ‘respect’ is. For example:

“I have difficulty with the word “proud”. … I think non-Indigenous Australians should be RESPECTFUL of the Indigenous culture. I feel we have a responsibility to help Indigenous people to feel proud of who they are. We have a responsibility to raise awareness of injustice that exists in our country against Indigenous people. We have a responsibility to recognize the past wrongs and rectify the situation (such as closing the gap in health and education). I feel honoured to know so many inspiring and wonderful indigenous people but I don’t feel that I have a right to say I am proud of a culture that isn’t mine. I haven’t earned the right to feel proud. What I wish I could say is that I am proud to live in a country that values and recognises its Indigenous population. …” (emphasis is respondent’s own)

While I can neither claim my little survey to be the model of empirical research, nor the responses received to be representative of the entire Australian population, I do feel a clear message comes through from this exercise: Non-Indigenous Australians should be proud – or at the very least, respectful – of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. More than that, non-Indigenous Australians want to be proud of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures.

The next question must be: what’s stopping them? What are the obstacles and barriers to non-Indigenous pride in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures? Is it that Australians are victims of history – that the historical beliefs and attitudes towards Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples still persists, perhaps subconsciously, in the Australian psyche? Is it that we have inadequate leadership guiding us towards a society that values Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures? Could it even be that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples ourselves have become so used to protecting and defending our cultural rights, responsibilities, and beliefs, that we are unable or unwilling to allow non-Indigenous Australians to be proud of us?

Perhaps when we can examine and address these questions, we will find ourselves moving towards a truly Reconciled Australia that not only recognises, but takes pride, in its Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

I would like to thank all those who participated in the survey for your responses. Anyone interested in viewing the raw data from the survey can find it here.

Do you think non-Indigenous Australians should be proud of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures? What do you think needs to change in order for this to happen? Please feel free to share your thoughts in the comments section below.

This post appears as part of the Deadly Bloggers Inaugural Blogging Carnival, held during Australia’s Blak History Month. To read other posts from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Bloggers, visit the Deadly Bloggers website.